picto_welcome.png  Welcome   

picto_download.png  Get Lubuntu   

picto_help.png  Documentation   

picto_contact.png  Get Help   


The Lubuntu Clock

The lubuntu date / time display is very adaptable.

Beginners

Use Languages

Language Support has details as to how to use the the language support tab to alter local settings.

Edit the command clock settings

Right Click on the clock, and select "Digital Clock" Settings

lubuntu-clock.png

The default is %R which is the clock in 24 Hour Format, based on your local time-zone. To explain how adaptable it is, below are a couple of examples to get you started.

It is Friday the 16th July 2010, at 35 seconds past 22 minutes past 4 o'clock in the afternoon. It currently shows as 16:42 and you want it displayed as

  • 04:22 PM

%I:%M %p
  • Fri 16 Jul 10 04:22 PM

%a %d %b %y  %I:%M %p
  • 07-16-10 04:22:35 PM

%F %r

If you set up your time-zone up when you installed your system, then

%c

will give you your date and time with your localised settings.

Easy

For a Good Strftime is a website that builds your "time string" for you.

Advanced

These command strings also apply accross all the time and date systems for configuration across the *buntu system.

The entire list of what you can customise is

  • %A is replaced by national representation of the full weekday name.
  • %a is replaced by national representation of the abbreviated weekday name.
  • %B is replaced by national representation of the full month name.
  • %b is replaced by national representation of the abbreviated month name.
  • %C is replaced by (year / 100) as decimal number; single digits are preceded by a zero.
  • %c is replaced by national representation of time and date.
  • %D is equivalent to %m/%d/%y.

  • %d is replaced by the day of the month as a decimal number (01-31).
  • %E* %O* POSIX locale extensions. The sequences %Ec %EC %Ex %EX %Ey %EY %Od %Oe %OH %OI %Om %OM %OS %Ou %OU %OV %Ow %OW %Oy are supposed to provide alternate representations. Additionly %OB implemented to represent alternative months names (used standalone, without day mentioned).
  • %e is replaced by the day of month as a decimal number (1-31); single digits are preceded by a blank.
  • %F is equivalent to %Y-%m-%d.

  • %G is replaced by a year as a decimal number with century. This year is the one that contains the greater part of the week (Monday as the first day of the week).
  • %g is replaced by the same year as in %G, but as a decimal number without century (00-99).

  • %H is replaced by the hour (24-hour clock) as a decimal number (00-23).
  • %h the same as %b.
  • %I is replaced by the hour (12-hour clock) as a decimal number (01-12).
  • %j is replaced by the day of the year as a decimal number (001-366).
  • %k is replaced by the hour (24-hour clock) as a decimal number (0-23); single digits are preceded by a blank.
  • %l is replaced by the hour (12-hour clock) as a decimal number (1-12); single digits are preceded by a blank.
  • %M is replaced by the minute as a decimal number (00-59).
  • %m is replaced by the month as a decimal number (01-12).
  • %n is replaced by a newline.
  • %O* the same as %E*.
  • %p is replaced by national representation of either "ante meridiem" or "post meridiem" as appropriate.
  • %R is equivalent to %H:%M.

  • %r is equivalent to %I:%M:%S %p.

  • %S is replaced by the second as a decimal number (00-60).
  • %s is replaced by the number of seconds since the Epoch, UTC (see mktime(3)).
  • %T is equivalent to %H:%M:%S.

  • %t is replaced by a tab.
  • %U is replaced by the week number of the year (Sunday as the first day of the week) as a decimal number (00-53).
  • %u is replaced by the weekday (Monday as the first day of the week) as a decimal number (1-7).
  • %V is replaced by the week number of the year (Monday as the first day of the week) as a decimal number (01-53). If the week containing January 1 has four or more days in the new year, then it is week 1; otherwise it is the last week of the previous year, and the next week is week 1.
  • %v is equivalent to %e-%b-%Y.

  • %W is replaced by the week number of the year (Monday as the first day of the week) as a decimal number (00-53).
  • %w is replaced by the weekday (Sunday as the first day of the week) as a decimal number (0-6).
  • %X is replaced by national representation of the time.
  • %x is replaced by national representation of the date.
  • %Y is replaced by the year with century as a decimal number.
  • %y is replaced by the year without century as a decimal number (00-99).
  • %Z is replaced by the time zone name.
  • %z is replaced by the time zone offset from UTC; a leading plus sign stands for east of UTC, a minus sign for west of UTC, hours and minutes follow with two digits each and no delimiter between them (common form for RFC 822 date headers).
  • %+ is replaced by national representation of the date and time (the format is similar to that produced by date(1)).
  • %% is replaced by `%'.

From the examples above, you should be able to format the date / clock system to your own needs.

Time Zones

If you have friends scattered across time zones, I would suggest you add date and time to your bookmarks. You will see it used when giving a link for meetings etc.

Lubuntu/Documentation/CustomizingTheClock (last edited 2012-04-02 23:12:59 by chrisdruif)