Parent page: Programming Applications

Introduction

The Mozart Programming System is an advanced development platform for intelligent, distributed applications. The system is the result of a decade of research in programming language design and implementation, constraint-based inference, distributed computing, and human-computer interfaces. As a result, Mozart is unequalled in expressive power and functionality. Mozart has an interactive incremental development environment and a production-quality implementation for Unix and Windows platforms. Mozart is the fruit of an ongoing research collaboration by the Mozart Consortium.

Mozart is based on the Oz language, which supports declarative programming, object-oriented programming, constraint programming, and concurrency as part of a coherent whole. For distribution, Mozart provides a true network transparent implementation with support for network awareness, openness, and fault tolerance. Mozart supports multi-core programming with its network transparent distribution and is an ideal platform for both general-purpose distributed applications as well as for hard problems requiring sophisticated optimization and inferencing abilities. We have developed many applications including sophisticated collaborative tools, multi-agent systems, and digital assistants, as well as applications in natural language understanding and knowledge representation, in scheduling and time-tabling, and in placement and configuration. (source)

Installing Mozart 2

You may want to first uninstall Mozart 1 if you have alreay installed it. To do that, open a terminal and run

sudo dpkg -r mozart mozart-stdlib

Installation Instructions for Ubuntu 64-bit

The official website of Mozart suggests installing the package mozart, mozart-doc and mozart-stdlib from the Ubuntu Software Center. Don't do that if you're running a 64-bit version of Ubuntu. These package are broken for this architecture.

Instead, follow the instructions below

  • Install GNU/Emacs, tcl8.5 and tk8.5.

  • Download the latest deb file here. If you are on Ubuntu 64 bit, it should end by -amd64.deb. amd64 is a synonym for x86_64, the 64 bit version of the Architecture x86 used by the AMD and Intel processor that are on almost all personal computers these days. At the time of writer, the name of the file is mozart2-2.0.0~alpha0+build.3777.62f3ec5-amd64.deb. If you are on Ubuntu 32 bits, it should end by -i386.deb where i386 is another name for x86 (more info here if you are curious).

  • Open your file manager (i.e. Nautilus) and double click on the downloaded file. It will open it with the Ubuntu Software Center. If it does not, right click on the file and choose "Open With Other Application..." and then select the Ubuntu Software Center.

  • The Ubuntu Software Center will say "Only install this file if you trust the origin.", this is normal. Click the Install button, authenticate as asked and wait for the installation to proceed. If it complains about dependency problem, check that you have correctly done the point 1. of this section.

Installing Mozart 1.4.0

Installation Instructions for Ubuntu 64-bit

The official website of Mozart suggests installing the package mozart, mozart-doc and mozart-stdlib from the Ubuntu Software Center. Don't do that if you're running a 64-bit version of Ubuntu. These package are brocken for this architecture.

Instead, follow the instructions below

Installation Instructions for Ubuntu 32-bit

Warning: if you are using a 64-bit version of Ubuntu, see the appropriate section above !

As suggested by the official website of Mozart, simply install the "mozart" package and the "mozart-stdlib" package. You can also get the doc by installing the "mozart-doc" package.

Troubleshooting

Graphics Engine (tk.exe) crashed or could not be started

If you get the following error message

Graphics Engine (tk.exe) crashed or could not be started

when launching Mozart. That's maybe because you are missing one of the three 32-bit packages you had to install. So check you have installed the "ia32-libs" package, the 32-bit "libx11-6" package (i.e. "libx11-6:i386") and 32-bit "libgmp10" package (i.e. "libgmp10:i386").

However, even if you do that, you may still end up with the same problem. If you go to /usr/lib/mozart/platform/unknown-unknown$ and type:

linux32 ./tk.exe

and you get something like

./tk.exe: error while loading shared libraries: libtk8.4.so.0: wrong ELF class: ELFCLASS64

That means tk.exe is still finding the wrong arch library. I managed to fix it by making a symbolic link in /usr/lib/mozart/platform/unknown-unknown/lib to the libraries installed by this package in /usr/lib32. Hope this helps, it worked for me.

If you get an error like the following

%********************** Error: module manager *******************
%**
%** Could not link module
%**
%** Could not load functor at URL: x-oz://system/wp/QTk.ozf
%**--------------------------------------------------------------

you are likelly to be missing some part of the Mozart standard library. Make sure you have installed the "mozart-stdlib" package as recommended above.

External Links

For more information about Mozart see the following links


CategoryInstallation

Mozart (last edited 2014-05-01 15:35:21 by blegat)